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Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
george wallace, but before that, something a little different tonight. it is our 10th year on pbs with thousands of show under our belt, so now i thought it was a good idea to introduce you to some of the people who have been with the show. chris macdonald. he is responsible for all of the great music guests that you see on our show. a pleasure to see you on. >> tavis, it is great to come on the show and to have the artists, and talk. i am glad to be a part of it. tavis: take it away. >> we are glad you could join us. our conversation with george wallace starts right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. if -- thank you. tavis: i am pleased to welcome george wallace back to the progra
can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: so llody price was there from the very beginning of rock- and-roll. his song "lawdy miss clawdy" crashed through barriers, going to mainstream radio. he included in hits like it's a personality" and -- like "personality" and "stagger lee," and he was inducted into the hall of fame. maybe this will jog your memory. ♪ rightreat me what you are doing to made i am going to tell everybody ♪ >> now, wikipedia says you turn 80 in march, and i am looking at you, and that cannot be possible. >> do you know what? it is. tavis: [laughs] the sunday chitlins. you could not be turning 80 in march. >> well, it is true, tavis. and it don't seem like it. it don't feel like it. i have done what i have done all of my life. i love sports, and i am a bowler. tavis: ok, go ahead and brag about your bowling. >> i have got six perfect games. tavis: all right. [laughter] >> it is very difficult. 73 million people bowl every year. on the 2.5% of the people have ever shot a perfect game. tavis: and
in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: taj mahal's eclectic career braces blues, jazz, americana. nine grammy nominations. he has been on a musical odyssey. that journey can be heard now in a new boxed set that includes 15 cds, 170 tracks. here is a small taste of this remarkable compilation. >> ♪ if i ever get out of this prison, i am going to do just like i please ♪ ♪ i am going to take off running to the nearest stretch of trees ♪ ♪ i am going to keep running, running, running through the years bunch of trees -- the nearest bunch of trees ♪ ♪ i am going to be running through these trees ♪ ♪daddy going to be running so fast it looks like daddy been running on his knees ♪ tavis: you just mentioned daddy, and i think that is a great way to start. tell me about your daddy's record collection. >> he is an interesting guy. my grandparents came here about 100 years ago and started having children in new york city. my dad was born in 1915, and everybody is going to notice
contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major support for frontline is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. more information is available at macfound.org. additional funding is provided by the park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. and by the frontline journalism fund, with a grant from millicent bell, through the millicent and eugene bell foundation. >> it's been a week since the shooting. (bell tolling) for most of the journalists in this newsroom, they've never covered anything that came close to being as horrific as this. it is a singular event in the history of connecticut. (bell tolls) >> narrator: a week after adam lanza massacred 20 children and six adults at sandy hook elementary school, church bells tolled across the state. memorials were erected to the 26 victims. president obama read out 26 names. but there was a 27th person murdered that day-- the gunman's mother, nancy
>> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: the world witnessed something today it had not seen since the 15th century: a sitting pope, benedict xvi, announced he is giving up the papacy. the news reverberated around the globe and stunned many of the world's 1.2 billion catholics. >> it was a big surprise because this doesn't happen all the time. and my first reaction was to pray and to call my friends, texted my friends and asked even my non-catholic and nonbelieving friends to keep us in their thoughts and in their prayers. >> i had never heard anything like
to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. and contributions in the neighborhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbor ♪ ♪ would you be mine? could you be mine? ♪ ♪ won't you be my neighbor? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighborhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbor ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ (laughing) - your turn! - ok! - whoops! hup! oops! oops! hi, neighbor! i'm at the park with my friends. - hiya, toots! - a rrroyal hello! - i've been working on my hopping. want to see? ok, here goes. whoops! one! two! three! three whole hops! that's so many! whoops! let's go show my friends. come on! (elaina laughin
documentary "cliff-hanger" on pbs takes us behind the scenes of the fiscal cliff drama on capitol hill. let's take a look at a clip. >> these guys are going into the meeting with the president. boehner has just been humiliated by his own people with the plan "b" debacle. and he tells harry reid to go [ bleep ] himself. >> harry reid looks up and he says, what? excuse me? and boehner says it again. >> hey, listen. senator reid and i are close friends. we've got to work together. but just like any close friends, sometimes you just need to clear the air. and we did. >> i can't imagine that happening. >> oh, gee. oh, that's never happened on capitol hill before, has it, michael? >> i was talking about between us. that's okay. >> that would never happen. so michael, take us behind the scenes. here i suspect pass is going to be prologged several times in the future. >> well, exactly right. when i look forward to the state of the union address tomorrow night, i'm looking forward to seeing john boehner and joe biden sitting behind barack obama, especially after what i learned in the last six months
battle for elephants. airs next wednesday on pbs. coming up, an olympian's day in court. we'll have a report from the trial of track star oscar pistorius and discuss fallen heroes. ahead on "now." i've always had to keep my eye on her... but, i didn't always watch out for myself. with so much noise about health care... i tuned it all out. with unitedhealthcare, i get information that matters... my individual health profile. not random statistics. they even reward me for addressing my health risks. so i'm doing fine... but she's still going to give me a heart attack. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. ♪ ♪ no two people have the same financial goals. pnc works with you to understand yours and help plan for your retirement. visit a branch or call now for your personal retirement review. let's see what you got. rv -- covered. why would you pay for a hotel? i never do. motorcycles -- check. atv. i ride those. do you? no. boat. house. hello, dear. hello. hello. oh! check it -- [ loud r&b on car radi
, and welcome to this "pbs newshour" special coverage of president obama's "state of the union" address. we want you to know this program is also being livestreamed on our home page on the web. in just a few moments, the president will spell out his policy agenda for the start of his second term. he is expected tonight to focus mainly on jobs and the economy, and to highlight other domestic priorities including gun control and immigration reform, but also to touch on international challenges. here with me, as they will be throughout our coverage tonight, are syndicated columnist mark shields and "new york times" columnist david brooks. mark, what is different about a state of the union when it's the first one of a second term? >> you don't have that many more to look forward to? the sand is running out of the glass. this is probably the best shot that most presidents have in their second term is that first year-and-a-half before you get into congressional elections and the lame duckness really sets in. the race to succeed him begins while he's just sitting there. so this is important. this is th
for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org i was sitting there in tears in my living room watching it. we learned the truth about america. ed asner: white actors were willing to break each other's legs to be in the show. i mean, these novels were just the best stuff ever. i do love you, meggie. i always will. and i found myself in the biggest melodrama of all time. the saga of an american family. now, you listen to old fiddler if you wants to keep alive. you in america now. but i think the responsibility of television is to lift up its audience, intellectually, spiritually, and emotionally. is to lift up its audience, intellectually, through programs like this, made available for everyone through contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. seacrest: they captured audiences like nothing before. "rich man, poor man," "roots," "thorn birds." look at the size of those audiences. they poured huge amounts of money
're learning more about the troubled background of adam lanza. a new investigation by pbs finds that lanza was diagnosed with a sensory disorder, was very shy and liked being touched only by his mother. as for the exposure to guns, friends say lanza's mother nancy loved shooting because it helped her bond with her son. >> extraordinary reporting. this is kind of one of the summary graphs of the story, what emerges in this exploration of a still unfolding story is a portrait of a mother apparently devoted but perhaps misguided, struggling to find a place for her son in society. and a boy exceptionally smart in some areas, profoundly deficient in others, who never found a place in the world. >> it's just so sad because of the outcome of this. you think when you look at what happened in their life, you think if she had just made a different decision somewhere along the way, this could have been avoided. and everybody points to the guns, and that being the wrong decision that she made. but perhaps it's not the guns. maybe it's the type of help she got for her son and it wasn't adequate enough.
couldn't deny them intellectually. so i adopted them. >> all right. that was a clip from the pbs documentary "makers: women who make america. a film about the evolution of women's roles over the past 50 years. with us, the mother/daughter pair featured in the film, founding editor of "ms." magazine, letty pogrebin and writer abby pogrebin. thanks for being here again. >> thanks for having us. >> i look at that clip, and it's a generational thing. what was radical when you did that was actually pretty normal by the time i grew up. i'd see my dad sitting on the couch and go, can you get me a sandwich? everybody would turn to him and say, get it yourself! it wasn't that way. >> it was very radical at the time. i was working full time. so was he. yet i would come home and bake bread in order to make stuffing for the turkey. >> you didn't even think twice about it, did you? >> no. it just was some role i was born into. and when i became a feminist, i read myself into radicalism. i suddenly looked around and said, this is ridiculous. i can't justify it. and so my husband and i used to
help society of "frontline," the pbs program that many of us watch and respect, detailed one woman's story in great detail. but that wasn't an isolated incident. the national prison rape elimination commission, created by congress, has said -- quote -- "as a group, immigration detainees are especially vulnerable to sexual abuse and its effects while detained. the prison rape elimination act of 2003, known as prea, was designed to eliminate sexual abuse of those in custody. it was bipartisan, championed by the late senator ted kennedy and senator sessions of alabama and i cosponsored it. prea required promulgation of national standards to prevent, detect and respond to prison rape in america. there have been questions raised about whether those standards would apply to immigration detainees. and as i've said before, when we drafted and passed prea, it was our intent it would apply to all in federal detention, including immigration detainees. i was pleased when president obama issued a memo clarifying that prea applies to all federal confinement facilities and directing agencies to a
're looking around in the 5% range here pb that will be healthy, 5% to 10%. >> how about you, rich? do you agree or do you have a different number? >> i think we're getting close to full value. earnings are coming in better than expected. two-thirds of companies reported sales. and i don't think this is the 2000 period where everybody is talking about stocks, joe. if we get past the sequester issues with sdwb either with a little bit of a pullback, not the 5% to 10% that the other guest is looking for, the markets are going to have to work higher. there's no other place to put your money right now. the 2% ten-year note doesn't have the competition when the s&p is yielding 2%. so we're still very constructive. and if earnings continue to come in better, we're going to have to raise our target. even though we may be a value in the short run, i still think stocks are the place to be and it's not a frothy market at all. >> because it's hard to get a return anywhere else. but, rich, what is your viewpoint on gdp this year? >> we're at roughly between 1.5% and 2%. >> and you don't think the mark
public service announcements featuring big bird set to run on several pbs stations next week. >> no matter what your age, it's important to get your body moving every single day to help keep you healthy. >> look, mrs. obama, i'm getting moving right now by jogging. >> joining me now for more on this, is leah goldman with "marie claire" magazine. >> we've seen the first lady enlist rachael ray to dr. oz and how would you rate the success of it? >> it's been a successful platform for the first lady, impressively so, i would say. she's seen some really significant results, actually, and typically you see first lady adopt these platforms and they go on the road with them and they do appearances for them, and we've actually seen some effects of this tour. for example, she's going out to mississippi, and since she started this let's move campaign, mississippi has seen a 13% drop of childhood obesity rate and that is the heaviest state in the nation so that's pretty impressive. >> let's look at poll numbers on the first lady. a poll taken two months ago shows that 73% of americans a
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)